Tag Archives: religion

Anti-Thomist Tidbits: A Brief Critique of the Evolutionary Argument Against Naturalism

Just a quick little something I whipped up for you guys about an annoying bit of reasoning I see my Thomist foes use quite a lot. It’s called the “Evolutionary Argument Against Naturalism.” The funny thing is, this argument was invented by a Protestant Christian, and Thomists are Catholic. It’s from Alvin Plantinga, one of […]

Free Will Ain’t Free

One thing I’ve often heard from Catholics, particularly “traditional” or conservative ones (most notably guys such as philosopher Edward Feser), is that free will is supposedly a good. Whenever someone brings up the fact that an omnipotent God could simply force everyone to worship Him (thereby resulting in no-one going to hell), people like Feser […]

The Problem with Desire

Been havin’ a great week so far, friends. Tons of videogames, plenty of great food, and general relaxation mark the submission of my third dissertation draft. A respite like this makes a fitting reward for the progress I made, wouldn’t you say? Even so, perhaps the process of working on that big ol’ project has […]

A little late, but not too late: My Book Review of Edward Feser’s “The Last Superstition”

Whooooo-eee! I am pretty late for this entry, my friends–I meant to post it up last friday. But it ended up being sooooo big I had to delay it to be happy with it! I think you’ll see why, because it’s nearly 40 thousand words! But I think it’s worth it, so I hope you […]

Musings on Religion (x-posted to my tumblr)

There’s an old quote from the Christian author and apologist C.S. Lewis that a lot of folks–Christians and conservatives, sure, but others as well–seem to like. I think it’s this one: “Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It would be better to live […]

Random Musings on Catholicism and Liturgical Languages (x-posted to Tumblr and Medium)

I can understand the historical reasons for the Catholic Church’s use of Latin as a liturgical language, of course. In Western Europe, at least, it was simultaneously “everyone’s and no-one’s” (as I recall one historian putting it, though I don’t remember his name). It was the only common language at a time when, following the […]

More thoughts on Islam–between a rock and a hard place

A bit more of a serious entry for you today, my friends, and still related to the recent Charlie Hebdo massacre, like my previous entry was as well. It has to do with a fallacious (IMO) argument I’ve been hearing a lot lately, mainly on my twitter and tumblr feeds. It goes like this (twitter […]